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The Taylorcraft as a Bush Plane

The Taylorcraft as a Bush Plane

Using a Taylorcraft as a bush plane can work great because of their STOL characteristics. Like a lot of planes from the immediate post-war era they are small and light. They score poorly on useful load, and won’t find a role as any kind of workhorse (like a Beaver), but they are cheap to fly and can get into some small strips.
Taylorcraft BC-12

When I use the term “Taylorcraft” I’m referring to the BC-12D. Taylorcraft made more than just that model, but that’s the most common model still around. Taylorcrafts (T-crafts/T-crates) were designed by Clarence Taylor, a self-taught aviation English aviation designer/manufacturer who began manufacturing in 1926, and made a real mark with the Taylor Cub in 1931. Taylor got involved with William Piper, and they were in business for a while, but their personalities clashed. Taylor left the company after the Cub was in production, with the aim of building a better version on his own. The original Taylor Cub went on to become the first Piper Cub in the late ’30s.

Taylor, meanwhile, started his company and began producing airplanes. The coming of the Second World War was an opportunity for all aircraft designers/manufacturers. Taylorcraft made light aircraft for the US, Canadian and British militaries. He even had a plant in England making Taylorcrafts and Austers. These aircraft were generally observation planes rather than fighters or bombers. After the war they began making the BC-12D – the logical extension of the wartime birds they had constructed.

The BC-12D is a rag and tube airplane. Taylor’s skill in design resulted in a side by side airplane with remarkably little drag. This resulted in good speeds, good lift, and good fuel economy. They generally have 65 or 85 horsepower engines. My Cessna 150 has 100 horses – imagine how small a 65 horse Continental is! It’s a horizontally opposed 4 cylinder with 171 cubic inch displacement.

They don’t come with electrics. You hand turn the prop and either go NORDO, use handlhelds, or retrofit them. Some, like the one below, have wind powered generators that work off the airspeed. You can’t see it too well in the big picture, but here’s what the round black thing hanging under the fuselage looks like:

taylorcraft BC-12 front end

Taylorcraft bc-12 generator

 

 

 

 

 

 

Taylorcraft BC-12 landing gear
The wings (which were quite well designed and more evidence of Taylor’s skill) have aluminum ribs, but wood spars made of laminated Spruce. If you’re thinking about buying an old T-craft you need to get a good look at the wooden spars – they’re just so old.

 

With the Continental 85 hp the T-craft burns about 4.2 gallons per hour. It will cruise at 95 mph, and stall at around 35 mph. Gross weight is approximately 1200 lbs. VNE is 140 MPH. The best approach speed is 60 MPH, which isn’t too bad (in my 150 I can approach at 60 mph but usually dial it in at 70 mph). Rate of climb at full power and gross weight is 500 FPM. It will carry 18 gallons, with a 12 gallon fuselage tank and a 6 gallon wing tank. This gives a no reserve range of 4 1/2 hours, or about 425 miles.

As bushplanes the T-craft can be fitted with wheels, floats or skis. The limiting factor, really, is weight. You’ll be able to get into some tight areas, but you’re going to have to travel light, and you aren’t loading a full moose into it – you’ll need a few trips. With the 85 hp motor it performs much better. Useful load seems to be about 600 lbs.

Here is a T-craft on skis.taylorcraft on skis

Here is one on floats (a 1940 model):

taylorcraft on floats

And here is one on tundra tires:

taylorcraft with tundra tires

(Thank you to Ken Stoltsfus, of John2031.com, for some of these great pics!)

 

My name is Rob Chipman and I’m a realtor and pilot based in Vancouver, BC. I AM NOT A FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR AND I AM NOT OFFERING FLIGHT INSTRUCTION! I am sharing my study notes and other things I’ve learned while getting my education as a pilot. You’re welcome to make use of this information, but do not treat it as expert advice.

I really enjoy flying, real estate and the Chilcotin.  My company is Coronet Realty Ltd., located at 3582 East Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC, V5K 2A7. I have a C-150L that I own with two other pilots, based out of Pitt Meadows. Do not hesitate to contact me by email if I can help you do anything, especially if its likely to be interesting or concerns selling remote property in British Columbia.

1/4 Share in Cessna 150-L For Sale

Fly Right Now!

We’re selling 1/4 share in a 1972 Cessna 150. The plane is hangared at Pitt Meadows.

Approximately 500 hours SMOH (new cylinders, etc) – time varies as it is flown regularly.

  • Gyros (turn indicator, heading indicator and attitude indicator) are low time
  • New alternator and starter
  • MK 12D Navcom
  • KLX Bendix King GPS/Com
  • Collins 650 ADF
  • Narco AT 150 Transponder
  • KA 134 Audio Panel
  • Portable 496 Garmin Yoke Mount GPS
  • Fresh Annual

There are two shares available. One partner currently has two shares and is selling one of them, and the other share is being sold by a partner who is leaving the country. Each share is prices at $6,500.00.

Partnership

Share purchase includes a 1/4 share in the airplane and a 1/4 interest in the partnership that maintains the airplane. The partnership agreement lays out the terms and conditions of ownership and and how operating and maintenance costs will be handled.

Monthly Costs

  • Monthly rent for the T-hangar is $238.00.
  • Insurance is approximately $100.00/month
  • Annual generally costs between $100.00-$135.00/month
  • There are usually a few repair bills during the year, but these are unknowns

My name is Rob Chipman and I’m a realtor and pilot based in Vancouver, BC. I AM NOT A FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR AND I AM NOT OFFERING FLIGHT INSTRUCTION! I am sharing my study notes and other things I’ve learned while getting my education as a pilot. You’re welcome to make use of this information, but do not treat it as expert advice.

I really enjoy flying, real estate and the Chilcotin.  My company is Coronet Realty Ltd., located at 3582 East Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC, V5K 2A7. I have a C-150L that I own with two other pilots, based out of Pitt Meadows. Do not hesitate to contact me by email if I can help you do anything, especially if its likely to be interesting or concerns selling remote property in British Columbia.

Private Pilot License Written Test Prep Quiz – Aviation Weather #2

Private Pilot License Written Test Practice Quiz – Weather #2

These study notes and the quiz were written to help me pass the private pilot license written test. They are based on the information two books – From The Ground Up, and Private Pilot Exam Prep Guide, by Sharper Edge.

The atmosphere is heated from below by long wave radiation reflecting back off the Earth. The heat waves coming from the sun are short wave. They pass through the atmosphere without heating it.


There are other ways heat moves around the atmosphere, heating different parts at different rates.

Convection is when warm air rises and is replaced by descending cooler air. This takes heat to the upper layers of the troposphere.

Advection is when cool air is heated by moving over warm earth.

Turbulence arising from friction between the earth and an air mass mechanically mixes air, thereby distributing heat.

Compression/ subsidence occurs when air sinks, leading to increased pressure. The compression raises temperatures by creating heat.

Isotherms are lines on a map that join places of equal temperatures. This picture is colored, but the isotherms are the actual lines. isotherm

Isobars connect areas of equal pressure.

Isotachs connect areas of constant wind velocity.

In a standard atmosphere the environmental lapse rate is 1.98 degrees per 1,000′.

A dry adiabatic lapse rate is 3 degrees per 1,000′.

When water vapour condenses it gives off heat, which in turn slows the cooling process. More water vapour means more potential condensation, so the wet or saturated adiabatic lapse rate is lower, like 1.5 degrees per 1,000′.

A standard atmosphere has a sea level temperature of 15 degrees celsius, 29.92″ pressure, and an environmental lapse rate of 2 degrees celsius per 1,000′.

Here is the Private Pilot Written Test Prep Quiz – Aviation Weather #2

The atmosphere is heated from:



When warm air rises and is replaced by descending cooler air, taking warm air to the upper layers of the troposphere, is is called:




When cool air is heated by moving over warm earth it is called:




When friction between the earth and an air mass mechanically mixes the air, thereby distributing heat through the atmosphere, it is called:





When air sinks, leading to increased pressure, the compression creates heat. This is called:





Lines on a map that join places of equal temperatures are called:





Lines on a map that join places of equal pressure are called:





Lines on a map that join places of equal wind velocity are called:





In a standard atmosphere the environmental lapse rate is:





A dry adiabatic lapse rate is:





A wet or saturated adiabatic lapse rate is approximately:





A standard atmosphere has a sea level temperature of :







My name is Rob Chipman and I’m a realtor and pilot based in Vancouver, BC. I AM NOT A FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR AND I AM NOT OFFERING FLIGHT INSTRUCTION! I am sharing my study notes and other things I’ve learned while getting my education as a pilot. You’re welcome to make use of this information, but do not treat it as expert advice.

I really enjoy flying, real estate and the Chilcotin.  My company is Coronet Realty Ltd., located at 3582 East Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC, V5K 2A7. I have a C-150L that I own with two other pilots, based out of Pitt Meadows. Do not hesitate to contact me by email if I can help you do anything, especially if its likely to be interesting or concerns selling remote property in British Columbia.

Private Pilot License Written Test Prep Quiz – Aviation Weather #1

These study notes and the quiz were written to help me pass the private pilot license written test. They are based on the information two books – From The Ground Up, and Private Pilot Exam Prep Guide, by Sharper Edge.


The atmosphere can be divided into four parts. Starting at the surface and going up they are: the troposhere, the stratosphere, the mesosphere and the thermosphere.
The atmosphere

Most flying and most weather happens in the troposphere.

The troposphere is lower at the poles (25,000′ to 30,000′) and higher at the equator (55,000-65,000).
troposphere height

At the top of the troposphere are strong winds called the jetstream.
Polar and sub-tropical jetstreams

Water vapor in the troposphere and vertical air currents, along with heating from the sun and subsequent cooling cause most weather.

The atmosphere is heated from below, not from above. The wavelengths of the sun’s rays are too short to heat the atmosphere (short wave radiation), but when they hit the earth they are reflected back with longer wavelengths. Longer wave radiation is absorbed by the atmosphere.

Heating of the earth is uneven. It heats up differently depending on time of day (day vs. night). Parts of the earth closer to the sun heat up more (summer vs. winter). Different surfaces heat up more (dark areas like forests vs. light areas like glaciers). Water absorbs and releases heat more slowly than land. The sun heats the land at higher latitudes less than at lower latitudes.

Water isn’t just in the oceans. It absorbs heat when it condenses or freezes and releases heat when it vapourizes.

Private Pilot License Written Test Prep Quiz

Please go to Private Pilot License Written Test Prep Quiz – Aviation Weather #1 to view the quiz

My name is Rob Chipman and I’m a realtor and pilot based in Vancouver, BC. I AM NOT A FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR AND I AM NOT OFFERING FLIGHT INSTRUCTION! I am sharing my study notes and other things I’ve learned while getting my education as a pilot. You’re welcome to make use of this information, but do not treat it as expert advice.

I really enjoy flying, real estate and the Chilcotin.  My company is Coronet Realty Ltd., located at 3582 East Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC, V5K 2A7. I have a C-150L that I own with two other pilots, based out of Pitt Meadows. Do not hesitate to contact me by email if I can help you do anything, especially if its likely to be interesting or concerns selling remote property in British Columbia.

Backcountry Strips – South Anahim Creek Airstrip and Wild Horses!

South Anahim Creek – Chilcotin Backcountry Airstrip

A piece of property at Alex Graham Lake led me to inspect a Chilcotin backcountry airstrip around South Anahim Creek. The area we’re talking about is a little north of Alexis Creek in the Chilcotin. I have no idea why the strip was built, or by who, but I wanted to see if it was a viable location for access to the lake. It is one of those backcountry strips that you can find on old maps and Google, but that not a lot of people seem to know about.

It’s not. First, it’s too far to walk from the strip to Alex Graham Lake. Second, the grass is pretty long and the strip is pretty short. What’s more, there is a lot of meadow in the area with shorter grass and longer rolls.

Location

Here is a topo map of the immediate area:
chilcotin backcountry airstrip

Here is a big Google map of the strip and Alex Graham Lake:


View Larger Map

And here is a Google map of the strip itself:

View Larger Map

You can see the strip, the surrounding meadows, and in the lower right hand corner an old ranch building. You can drive to the strip, but it’s tough to find without a GPS. You could fly and camp there, however. Anahim Creek offers fresh water, there is plenty of firewood, lots of places to camp, and you can cross the creek on foot to get to the old ranch.

abandoned chilcotin ranch house

Why Go?

To be honest, there isn’t a lot to recommend this destination except the wild horses. It’s a nice place – all the Chilcotin is – but there is nothing extraordinary. However, the horses were cool, and if that’s their territory you could see them again. In fact, it would probably not be too hard to spot them from the air if you don’t spook them. These are wild horses, and they’re harder to approach than deer. They see you from a long way off and aren’t crazy about you getting too close.

chilcotin wild horses
chilcotin wild horses
chilcotin wild horses

The Strip

The grass on the strip is different from the native stuff, which is makes it easy to see. However, that part of the strip is probably only 1,000 feet long. There are a few big rocks to watch out for. If I knew it was dry I’d probably land in the meadow close just across the creek from the ranch house.

This is the strip looking north:
chilcotin backcountry airstrip

And this is looking south:
chilcotin backcountry airstrip

According to my GPS the coordinates are 52.11.426 123.09.337. Elevation is 3,759′, but I’m not sure how deadly my GPS is for elevation.

Backcountry strips

Bit by bit I’ll add to my list of backcountry strips. A backcountry strip is a trail head. You can get into remote areas faster, with less carbon footprint, and experience the great outdoors more efficiently. If you know of any good backcountry strips, let me know. Send me some info on them and I’ll see if I can post it here.

My name is Rob Chipman and I’m a realtor and pilot based in Vancouver, BC. I AM NOT A FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR AND I AM NOT OFFERING FLIGHT INSTRUCTION! I am sharing my study notes and other things I’ve learned while getting my education as a pilot. You’re welcome to make use of this information, but do not treat it as expert advice.

I really enjoy flying, real estate and the Chilcotin.  My company is Coronet Realty Ltd., located at 3582 East Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC, V5K 2A7. I have a C-150L that I own with two other pilots, based out of Pitt Meadows. Do not hesitate to contact me by email if I can help you do anything, especially if its likely to be interesting or concerns selling remote property in British Columbia.

100 Mile House Airport and Uphill Tailwind Departures

100 Mile House Airport

100 Mile House airport is a good jumping off place for a lot of Chilcotin and Cariboo recreation. The airport is run by the 100 Mile House Flying Club. The club members appear very friendly (I met and chatted with their president, Ken, this past weekend).
100 Mile House Airport
From their website:

One of the advantages of landing at the 100 Mile House Airport is its unique position right downtown 100 Mile House, with numerous hotels, motels and restaurants literally within walking distance from the airport. During summertime, we encourage pilots to “tent under the wing” at the airport. In the wintertime, budget oriented pilots can use the 100 Mile House Flying Club’s Clubhouse for a night or two or, due to bad weather, for a longer time. The Clubhouse is equipped with shower and W/C. Please bring sleeping bags.

The airstrip is actually right in town – you can walk from your plane to a grocery store or restaurant. You can rent a car from Sunrise Ford. Avgas is available.
100 Mile House Airport

Uphill Tailwind Take-Offs

Runway 08/26 in 100 Mile House is 2000 ft long, and is slightly uphill. I was fortunate enough to see the result of an aborted take-off uphill with a tailwind. The unfortunate pilot hit some phone lines, spun around and crashed backwards into a concrete building. Everyone walked away, and the plane can probably be had quite cheaply.

crashed Cessna

crashed Cessna

I was pleasantly surprised at the cost of a hangar and tie downs. Apparently you can get a hangar for as low as $15,000, and tie downs cost about $40 a year. Here in the Lower Mainland I pay $300/month for a T-hangar!

Planes

There weren’t a ton of planes hanging around, but there was this old Luscombe. It was for sale last year, but it’s not on the market any longer.

100 mile house airport

However, there is a Cherokee 180 for sale that is said to be a great bush plane (low wing nose gear notwithstanding). There is a video of the plane on YouTube landing at Silvertip Lodge’s uphill grass strip. The owner is the Ken that I was chatting with. he likes the plane for rough strips because of the wide under carriage and the load it carries. Check out the video and get a good look at the downhill dogleg airstrip, and the terrain right after the strip!

My name is Rob Chipman and I’m a realtor and pilot based in Vancouver, BC. I AM NOT A FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR AND I AM NOT OFFERING FLIGHT INSTRUCTION! I am sharing my study notes and other things I’ve learned while getting my education as a pilot. You’re welcome to make use of this information, but do not treat it as expert advice.

I really enjoy flying, real estate and the Chilcotin.  My company is Coronet Realty Ltd., located at 3582 East Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC, V5K 2A7. I have a C-150L that I own with two other pilots, based out of Pitt Meadows. Do not hesitate to contact me by email if I can help you do anything, especially if its likely to be interesting or concerns selling remote property in British Columbia.

Private Pilot License Written Exam Prep Quiz #11

I wrote this quiz to help me pass the Private Pilot License exam. There is no guarantee that the questions here will turn up on the test. I made them up myself while studying the material. If you think about it, there is actually very little chance that the questions will turn up on the actual test. That’s good, because you don’t just want to learn the answers to the test questions. You need to learn the material itself. These questions will help by testing your knowledge of the material and help memorize it.

Feel free to use any of these quizzes at your own risk. The best way to do it is to read one of the manuals, like the Private Pilot Exam Preparation Guide from Sharper Edge, and do the quizzes as you work through the book. That way you’ll help drill the knowledge into your head.

If there are any errors in the answers, please let me know. You can contact me at rob@robchipman.net.

Please go to Private Pilot License Written Exam Prep Quiz #11 to view the quiz

My name is Rob Chipman and I’m a realtor and pilot based in Vancouver, BC. I AM NOT A FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR AND I AM NOT OFFERING FLIGHT INSTRUCTION! I am sharing my study notes and other things I’ve learned while getting my education as a pilot. You’re welcome to make use of this information, but do not treat it as expert advice.

I really enjoy flying, real estate and the Chilcotin.  My company is Coronet Realty Ltd., located at 3582 East Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC, V5K 2A7. I have a C-150L that I own with two other pilots, based out of Pitt Meadows. Do not hesitate to contact me by email if I can help you do anything, especially if its likely to be interesting or concerns selling remote property in British Columbia.

Private Pilot License Written Exam Prep Quiz #10

I wrote this quiz to help me pass the Private Pilot License exam. There is no guarantee that the questions here will turn up on the test. They just test your knowledge of the material and help memorize it. Feel free to use it at your own risk.

The best way to do it is to read one of the manuals, like the Private Pilot Exam Preparation Guide from Sharper Edge, and do the quizzes as you work through the book. That way you’ll help drill the knowledge into your head.

Please go to Private Pilot License Written Exam Prep Quiz #10 to view the quiz

My name is Rob Chipman and I’m a realtor and pilot based in Vancouver, BC. I AM NOT A FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR AND I AM NOT OFFERING FLIGHT INSTRUCTION! I am sharing my study notes and other things I’ve learned while getting my education as a pilot. You’re welcome to make use of this information, but do not treat it as expert advice.

I really enjoy flying, real estate and the Chilcotin.  My company is Coronet Realty Ltd., located at 3582 East Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC, V5K 2A7. I have a C-150L that I own with two other pilots, based out of Pitt Meadows. Do not hesitate to contact me by email if I can help you do anything, especially if its likely to be interesting or concerns selling remote property in British Columbia.

PPL Written Test Prep Quiz #9

I wrote this quiz to help me pass the PPL written exam. There is no guarantee that the questions here will turn up on the test. They just test your knowledge of the material and help memorize it. Feel free to use it at your own risk.

Please go to PPL Written Test Prep Quiz #9 to view the quiz

My name is Rob Chipman and I’m a realtor and pilot based in Vancouver, BC. I AM NOT A FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR AND I AM NOT OFFERING FLIGHT INSTRUCTION! I am sharing my study notes and other things I’ve learned while getting my education as a pilot. You’re welcome to make use of this information, but do not treat it as expert advice.

I really enjoy flying, real estate and the Chilcotin.  My company is Coronet Realty Ltd., located at 3582 East Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC, V5K 2A7. I have a C-150L that I own with two other pilots, based out of Pitt Meadows. Do not hesitate to contact me by email if I can help you do anything, especially if its likely to be interesting or concerns selling remote property in British Columbia.

PPL Written Test Prep Quiz #8

I wrote this quiz to help me pass the PPL written exam. There is no guarantee that the questions here will turn up on the test. They just test your knowledge of the material and help memorize it. Feel free to use it at your own risk.

Please go to PPL Written Test Prep Quiz #8 to view the quiz

My name is Rob Chipman and I’m a realtor and pilot based in Vancouver, BC. I AM NOT A FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR AND I AM NOT OFFERING FLIGHT INSTRUCTION! I am sharing my study notes and other things I’ve learned while getting my education as a pilot. You’re welcome to make use of this information, but do not treat it as expert advice.

I really enjoy flying, real estate and the Chilcotin.  My company is Coronet Realty Ltd., located at 3582 East Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC, V5K 2A7. I have a C-150L that I own with two other pilots, based out of Pitt Meadows. Do not hesitate to contact me by email if I can help you do anything, especially if its likely to be interesting or concerns selling remote property in British Columbia.